Combatting Corruption: An Institutional Economics Approach for More Integration in the Eurozone

February 10, 2020

This article defends an enforceable EU anti-corruption mechanism to restore trust between creditor and debtor countries of the Eurozone. Through an institutional economics approach, it argues that strengthening national institutions is key for further economic integration because accumulating debt is possible so long as institutions are competent, such as Belgium and France.

Johann Diaz Manzano

Désir d’indépendance et interdépendance Européenne : un paradoxe à résoudre

February 6, 2020

L’interdépendance croissante des pays et des peuples européens d’une part, et la montée du sentiment ainsi que des mouvements politiques anti-européens d’autre part, constituent un paradoxe, qu’il convient de résoudre en promouvant l’européanité via un renforcement des coopérations transfrontalières.

Théodore Tallent & Meryl Merran

Essay Competition: Protest Movements – A Vehicle For Change?

January 30, 2020

From Hong Kong to Santiago, and Baghdad to Paris. Unique in their causes, united in their ambitions: Change. In 2019, people all around the globe took to the streets to make their voices heard through public protest. As part of its January 2020 essay competition, The Policy Corner invites you to submit your analysis, ideas, […]

The Policy Corner

Data as a Resource? A Simplistic Metaphor and its Policy Implications

December 16, 2019

The notion that personal data is “the new oil” is as ubiquitous as it is powerful, but it has misguided policies on many levels. This notion justifies institutions that drive unequal transactions between individuals and platform enterprises, as well as protectionist international policies. A fairer digital economy requires a move beyond the simplistic view of data as a resource.

Christopher Olk

China and the IMF – Convergence or Conflict?

November 24, 2017

In this episode, we discuss China’s economic rise, its growing aspirations on the global stage and what all of this means for global institutions such as the International Monetary Fund. We also talk about heightened tensions in the South China Sea and looming conflict between the longtime hegemon United States and the emerging superpower China.

Riccardo Ramacci & Felix Hoffmann

Bringing Human Rights Home

October 24, 2017

In this episode we discuss human rights, the sustainable development goals and what role transnational cooperations have in realizing them with Policy Corner co-founder Fabio Thoma.

Felix Hoffmann & Fabio Thoma

Metropolis 2.0: Cities’ Power to Shape a Greener Future

October 22, 2017 Energy and Environment

Current urbanization rates will lead to an increased concentration of people and economic activities in megacities, offering both opportunities and dangers for sustainability. Future development strategies should focus on achieving low-carbon urban growth. At the same time, cities need to take a more active role in seeking inter-urban cooperation.

Rafael Widmer

Child or Migrant?

September 25, 2017 Human Rights and International Law

While governments quarrel over closed borders, unaccompanied children that migrate to Europe in hope of a better life are often detained in inadequate conditions facing life threatening dangers, missing critical months of schooling and undergoing hardship that no person should endure, let alone a child. There is a need for harmonization of protection standards at the European level and a total abolition of the practice of detaining unaccompanied migrant children.

Alexandra Luisa Rinaldi

Seeking an International Climate Displacement Agreement

September 11, 2017

In this episode we have Alina Bill-Weilandt and Delia Roling who share their thoughts on climate displacement and why there is currently a gap in international law when it comes to recognizing the protection needs of those displaced by the effects of climate change.

Felix Hoffmann, Delia Roling and Alina Bill-Weilandt

Europe’s Bouncers, Europe’s Disgrace

September 5, 2017 European Policy

The European Union’s reaction to the so-called “refugee crisis“ has mainly included intensified externalization of migration controls. This approach is counterproductive because it exacerbates vulnerabilities, strengthens transnational criminal networks and blocks political capital for sustainable solutions. A new approach to European migration policy is urgently needed.

Felix Hoffmann