U.S. vs. China? Cooperation in Telecommunications in East Africa

May 3, 2022

Some Western political strategists suggest a “Tech Cold War” is playing out in Africa between China and the U.S. Based on case studies from Ethiopia and Kenya, this perspective neglects the actual state of affairs. Instead of searching for “China-free” actors, the West should take the rationale of each project as a yardstick to stay engaged and relevant in the emerging African information and communications technology sector.

Jonas Pauly

Devolved Governance: Enhancing the Resilience of Cities

March 9, 2022

This article explores the advantages of devolved governance in city planning instead of a centralized approach. Transferring decision-making power from central government to the local level can equip cities with the flexibility to respond to critical policy areas such sustainable infrastructure and quality social housing.

Julian Baxter

Achieving Integration for Immigrants in Iceland

November 10, 2021

Despite introducing ground-breaking social policies, Iceland lacks a cohesive approach to ensure the successful integration of immigrants. This group is left unprotected against hidden discrimination in the housing, employment, and education sectors. The successful integration of immigrants should involve treating them as agents of positive change in society.

Jordi Cortes

For the Sake of Emirati Women: Equal Citizenship

October 29, 2021

Citizenship rights are crucial for the protection of a nation’s citizens. Yet in the UAE women face arbitrary discrimination in citizenship and immigration law. The law deprives women of the ability to confer citizenship on their foreign husbands and children. Gender-focused reform, alongside regional efforts, is necessary to stop this discrimination.

Samira Maryam Mohammed Ashraf

Blockchain and the Fight Against Illicit Financial Flows

February 19, 2018 Development and Global Health

Illicit financial flows have staggering consequences for global health and development in the world’s poorest countries. Existing policies address this issue but their success is limited by a paradigm of centralization. Blockchain and mobile technologies have enabled new policy possibilities around a paradigm of decentralization and disaggregation to a wider range of stakeholders.

Michael Brooks

Public Credit Scores – A Weapon Against Debt Accumulation?

February 9, 2018 Economic Policy

Debt fueled consumption lay at the heart of the global financial crisis of 2008. Now ten years later, rising household debt in developed economies remains a significant issue. In this article Babatunde Valentine Onabajo proposes a novel solution: making individual credit scores public.

Babatunde Valentine Onabajo

Fossil Fuels: The Case For Ending Producer Subsidies

February 2, 2018 Energy and Environment

Fossil fuel subsidies are bad. Bad for government budgets. Bad for the economy. And bad for the climate. While reform efforts have focused on cutting consumer subsidies, those for production remain prevalent. To realize global climate ambitions, the G20 has to get serious and end producer subsidies.

Tim Pfefferle

The Leontief Strategy of Trade Negotiation

January 31, 2018 Economic Policy

International trade is under strain and backward-looking trade negotiation strategies play a role in building up this pressure. Drawing on the World Input-Output Database, Andrea Andrenelli adopts a global Leontief approach and develops three indices to make trade policymaking fit for the era of global value chains.

Andrea Andrenelli

Back to the Future? Populism and Spatial Inequality

January 28, 2018 Politics and Society

The rise of populism and the growing political polarization in advanced economies has exposed the phenomenon of spatial inequality. Globalization and digitalization amplify spatial inequalities by further concentrating “gains” and “losses.” For policymakers, confronting this complex problem without promising a “return to the past” is the challenge of our time.

George Kibala Bauer

A New Global Peace Paradigm

December 31, 2017

Welcome to Episode 6 of our policycorner.org podcast series! In this episode, Sarah Bressan talks about multilateralism, national self-interest and rising tensions in the United Nations over which of these paradigms will characterize the future of international collaboration. We also talk about the US’ recent decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and […]

Sarah Bressan & Felix Hoffmann